Chronicle OR: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Telekinesis

Though the style may be running rampant recently, I must admit that I am a fan of the “found footage” gimmick. Something about the whole let’s-all-pretend-just-for-like-an-hour-and-a-half-that-this-is-actually-happening shtick makes for some creative (if contrived) uses of camera and sound that often have the effect of making the ridiculous seem tangible. With the debatable exception of “Cloverfield,” most found footage films thus far have been of the horror persuasion. “Chronicle,” the latest release to utilize the style, is more of a high-school-set action/dramedy. Is this where found footage films jump the proverbial shark, or does this gimmicky style still have some battery life left in its camera?

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The Adventures of Tintin

I can quite honestly say that I would not be as enthusiastic about the medium of film as I am today without the films of Steven Spielberg. Specifically, that enthusiasm would be nonexistent without the Indiana Jones trilogy (that’s right, TRILOGY). I can remember seeing “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” for the first time as if it was yesterday (yes, I saw them out of order, don’t judge me). Even on a crappy VHS on a small TV, I was swept up in the globe-trotting, treasure-hunting adventures of Dr. Jones and his affable gang of companions. Recently, Spielberg gave us a return to that kind of film with “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull,” but the results were lacking in a certain je-ne-sais-quoi. Actually, je sais precisely quoi; it was lacking in heart and character and quality setpieces and any appearance of genuine giving-a-shit. Thankfully, Spielberg has been given a second chance at producing that brand of cinematic adventuring (this time sans the confused mind of a 2012-fearing George Lucas) with the animated motion-capture spectacle “The Adventures of Tintin.” Was Spielberg able to find redemption this time around? The answer is a surprising “Pretty much, yeah.”

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Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows

He can tell EXACTLY what you had for breakfast this morning.

It’s nearing Christmas, which apparently means studios are required to release ALL THE MOVIES right fucking now. It’s a winter season full of rollicking action/adventure romps, dour oscar-bait, and family-friendly crowd pleasers. With so many choices available to you during your holiday break, you may be wondering if “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows,” the sequel to the 2009 hit “Sherlock Holmes,” is worth your hard-earned coin. Does it provide more exciting mystery and slow-motion fisticuffs? Is Victorian London still grey as a shark’s backside? Do Sherlock and Watson just SHUT UP AND KISS ALREADY? The answers to these questions after the break!

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Paul. Is. Awesome.

"We're just a pair of regular guys walking down the street... with a small cowboy."

I’ve been a fan of Simon Pegg and Nick Frost since twenty minutes into “Shaun of the Dead” back when I first saw it in theaters in 2004. Their undeniable charm and impeccable writing had me hooked on the dynamic British duo instantly. A few years later, the pair returned with “Hot Fuzz“, again working with Writer/Director Edgar Wright to deliver another incredible film. I was sold: these three guys make great fucking movies. My sheer faith in Wright convinced me to watch “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World” knowing almost nothing about the film or graphic novel, and it ended up being one of my favorite movies of all time.

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Battle LA: Eckhart Was the Ssgt. This Platoon Needed, But Not The One It Deserved

Just got home from watching “Battle: Los Angeles” tonight, and I’ve got to say, I thought it was a pretty damn entertaining movie. It wasn’t perfect, but if you’re looking for a good war movie (yes, that’s how I’ll categorize it), definitely check this one out. For the skeptics, check it out matinée.

For those who aren’t familiar, “Battle: LA” is about a small Marine platoon that receives orders to find and evacuate a group of civilians amidst a very sudden and very devastating alien invasion. Those expecting a crazy sci-fi movie a la “District 9” should be prepared for a totally different kind of film. Where District 9 was a great science fiction movie with its main focus following Wikus’s forced transformation into an alien and evasion of the government, “Battle: LA” is a more of a traditional war movie that just so happens to involve aliens as the enemy instead of the usual Russians or Middle-Easterners.

Warning: Spoilers ahead!

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